• EAEP

El araj Season 4:THE FINAL DAY— Day Five (Week 4)


The excavation team arranged on the perimeter of the Byzantine church of the Apostles.


Once again I apologize for the delay in posting this. There were internet problems followed by a hectic couple of days. We completed the four week season in grand fashion. The final day was spent preparing the site for 11 months abandoned and subject to the elements. We had to sweep every inch of the site in preparation of the drone photography the next day and the creation of a 3D reconstruction of our site. The shade cloth was removed and cleaning ensued. In Area A, Sunya, Kathryn, and Sandra Arias worked to repair and stabilize the mosaics. Johan and Joses (our 3 yo's from Hong Kong) continued their own excavation near the sifting station. In Area C the team cleaned in much the same way that Area A was done. However, during the final day what emerged was a large, more well defined Roman taboon (oven). It seems large enough to cook an entire goat in it. The final two pictures in this post are an aerial shot of Area A and a group shot by Zachary Wong. In the group shot (see above) we were lined up along the perimeter of the Byzantine Church of the Apostles that we have discovered this year. Much of it is waiting for us to uncover it in the next season. Consider joining us in our search of Bethsaida-Julias. For more information on how you can join us in making history, check out the excavation registration website: https://emmausonline.net/…/2020-el-araj-excava…/welcome.html.



Final instructions on the last day of the dig.

Area A uncovered.

It seemed like mosaics surfaced in every square.

Kinneret College students help to brush the site.

Byzantine mosaic.

Kathryn works to repair the mosaics.

Sunya and Sandra prepare the mosaics for the off season.

Sunya and Sandra prepare the mosaics for the off season.

Uncovering the taboon.

Cleaning Area C.

Finishing Area C.

Aerial photo of Area A.

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